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Don't Just Throw Your Wine Rack On The Counter!

A counter top wine rack is a perfect solution for wine enthusiasts (or wine enthusiasts at heart) looking for a short term storage solution for smaller quantities of wine. Not only are they stylish, but they are also available in so many varieties of styles, materials and capacities that there is a counter top wine rack to fit the personal tastes of almost anyone. What most people don’t understand, however is that using a counter top wine rack is not as simple as placing it on a counter and filling it with bottles of wine. If your wine is going to be consumed quickly this might be ok, but if you are looking to store a bottle of wine for even more than a couple of weeks there are a few things which should be kept in mind to help keep your wine tasting it’s best when you pop the cork.

1.Temperature: A wine rack should never be placed where it is going to be in close contact with extreme heat, whether it is a counter top wine rack, floor standing or wall mounted. Never place a wine rack near a heater, stove, oven or other appliance that generates heat. Wine that becomes too hot can "cook" and degrades the wine. On the contrary, some wines should never be store in extreme cold either. For example, a wine rack storing red wine should never be stored near cold drafts.

2.Sunlight: can also affect the aging process. It is important to keep wines out of direct sunlight, which is one reason many wines, especially reds, are distributed in tinted bottles. As such, white wines are usually the most susceptible to sunlight. Even though UV rays can still affect and if left long enough ruin, a bottle of wine, if your are using a counter top wine rack for short term storage of wine just keeping the bottles out of direct sunlight will be sufficient.

3.Vibration: If storing wines for any length of time it is best to put it in a place where large heavy vibrations will not be occurring. For example in my kitchen I have an under counter washing machine/dryer which tends to vibrate and shake quite a bit when in the spin cycle. It would be unwise of me to put a counter top wine rack on that counter because the vibration from the washing machine would cause the wine to become shaken up and disturb the sediment.

Keeping these three simple factors in mind might initially make it a little more difficult to find the perfect place to put your counter top wine rack, but you will thank yourself for it when you open your first bottle of wine and it tastes perfect!

 About the Author:

Ken Finnigan is the CEO of Finest Wine Racks a website specializing in quality decorative wine racks and durable wine storage systems.

 

           

 

Why I Love Wine Holders And Wine Caddies!

Aside from the brief mention here and there with regards to the Wine Bug or Bugus Erectus, very little mention has been made as to how versatile a wine holder or wine caddy really can be! At the risk of sounding like an infomercial, I would like to point out why I love wine holders and wine caddies.

A wine holder is a great way to display that single bottle of wine that you want to set apart from the rest of your collection. Maybe you have a bottle of wine that you bought while on your honeymoon in France, or maybe it’s just a bottle from the market, which you think is fabulous, either way wine bottle holders are a better option to simply standing it on the counter. We all know that bottles should not be stood up because the cork can dry out and spoil the wine, so not only does a wine holder display you favourite bottle, but it also does this the correct way!

Some wine holders also double as a wine server, which makes it even more appealing. Aside from just showing off a bottle of wine, wine servers also are a great way to serve that Chardonnay or Merlot at a dinner party. From traditional to a little more eccentric, wine servers are always a conversation piece as well as a fantastic method for displaying and serving wine.

How often have you been invited to dinner and showed up with a bottle of wine in a plastic supermarket shopping bag or a brown paper sack from the liquor store? I know I have done it many times, and always feel a little awkward showing up at a nice dinner with the bottle in a brown bag that makes you look like a bum. Enter the wine caddy! Able to hold from one bottle to a few, a wine caddy is, in my humble opinion, a much better way of transporting wine. Some even hold wine glasses, which is perfect if you are looking to have a lovely picnic in the park (be aware of public drinking laws before doing this, while it might be acceptable in some places, others you could get arrested).

So this is why I love the wine caddy and the wine holder! So many styles and so many uses, I only wish I had written about them sooner!

About the Author:

Ken Finnigan is the CEO of Finest Wine Racks a website specializing in quality decorative wine racks and durable wine storage systems.

 

           

 

How To Choose A Wine Rack To Fit Your Style And Budget

Cultivating an appreciation of wine is a growing trend in the US. Shops specializing in wine are appearing throughout the country, not just in the traditional vineyard regions of California, Oregon, and Virginia. People who may not have grown up around wine are now drawn not only to sampling but also to collecting it. Tasting parties and special wine pairing events are a common theme in restaurants and in the home. With this comes an increase in interest in home storage. While proper storage can help wines become even more exquisite, improper storage can lead to ruined wine.

A freestanding, temperature controlled wine rack is ideal, but much more expensive than a simple wooden or metal wine rack. However, it is not necessary to spend several thousand dollars to enjoy wine in your home. If you can find a dark, cool, slightly humid location in your house, you will be able to then select a simple rack that will keep your wine for years to come. The ideal location will be 50-60 degrees, with constant 60-70 percent humidity.

Wine Rack Kits

One way to cut down on cost is to build your own wine rack. For first-time enthusiasts, it is probably best to stick to a wine rack kit. There are many considerations when designing a wine rack, and starting from a kit will keep the wine in the rack where it should be - the last thing you want is the whole thing to come crashing to the floor due to a miscalculation.

There are many commercially available wooden racks that offer snap-together assembly, requiring nothing more than a hammer. These inexpensive kits are usually made of redwood or pine, and can be bought for under $35.

The most important thing to keep in mind when building your own wine rack is to consider the strength of the rack. A bottle of wine weighs approximately 3 pounds, so the weight adds up quickly. Make sure not only the rack but the floor itself can handle the weight, keeping in mind the weight of the rack.

If the kit is wooden, make sure the wood has been dried properly (no more than 14% moisture), and that the cross sections are no less than 3/8" (1/2" is better).

Also, make sure the wine is stored horizontally so that the wine stays in contact with the cork. A dry cork signifies that the wine has been damaged.

Wine Rack Capacity

How much wine do you need?

While having 1500 bottles of wine on hand sounds exciting, most people have neither the space nor the wallet to support such a venture. If you would like to have something for everyday, a 15-30 capacity rack should meet your needs. That way, you can have 2 bottles of sparkling wine, 3 bottles of red (merlot or cabernet), 3 bottles of white (chardonnay, pinot grigio, or white zinfandel), one bottle each of red and white cooking wine, and still have room for a few special bottles that you plan to let age for years. Also keep a nice red ready for company, and a reisling or shiraz for a spicy meal. Have one bottle of white wine on hand in the refrigerator (it will only last in there for a week), and you'll be ready for any gathering. A 30-bottle capacity rack is enough for a wine-tasting, an extended gathering, or for someone who likes to try a different wine every day.

Also, keep in mind that most wine rack manufacturers list the total bottle capacity. This may be different from racked wine capacity, as total capacity may have bottles stacked directly on top of each other. While this will not damage the wine, it is not as aesthetically pleasing and may be inconvenient when getting the wine out of the rack.

Styles of Wine Racks: Location is Key

Wine racks come in many styles. Racks can be freestanding cabinets, counter top, or wall mounted.

When choosing a style, keep the following in mind:

How much space do you actually have?
Do you want the wine rack to be visible, or would you rather have a large, hidden wine rack that does not necessarily match your home's decor?
Where can you put the wine rack?

The most important part of your choice is the location. If you choose a rack that is not freestanding, make sure it is protected from vibrations. It is not a good idea to put the wine rack next to the sink where the disposal will rattle it. Never place the rack on the top of the refrigerator, as it gets very warm. Also, keep the rack away from a window, as the temperature may vary too much, and UV light will damage the wine.

If you can not find a wine rack to fit in that perfect location and you are not confident of making your own, consider having a custom wine rack created just for you. While this option is more expensive than an off-the-rack version, it is still much less than the freestanding units, and can keep your wine for years to come.

Wine Rack Material

Wine racks come in a variety of materials, from wood to metal to glass. Whether you choose one made of mahogany or steel depends on a variety of factors, include cost, weight, and appearance.

Wooden Wine Racks

The most common type of wine rack is the wooden wine rack. It is generally easier to assemble and relatively light. Common woods are pine, cedar, spruce, oak, and redwood. Another less common wood is mahogany. Mahogany is a high quality wood and is used in both moderate and expensive racks.

Metal Wine Racks

Metal wine racks are becoming increasingly popular, especially those made of steel. They are very strong and last longer than wooden racks with less care. They can be painted to match any home. They can also be formed into a wider variety of shapes while maintaining their strength.

Choosing a wine rack should be an enjoyable process. Consider it an investment for all the wines you will try today as well as those you will keep for a special occasion down the road.

 About the Author:

Jason Connors is a wine lover providing valuable tips and advice on wine cellar design, wine making, and wine basics. Read his recent report on "What To Look For in a Wine Cooling System".

           

 

 

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This page was last updated on: Monday, December 11, 2006